November 24, 2021

Since 1922, ADK has been teaching people how to explore and protect New York’s public lands and waters. Over that time, we have empowered millions of outdoor recreators by welcoming them into a community centered around education and stewardship.

This impact has been made possible thanks to generous donations from people like you. Here are five ways this support made a difference in 2021.


28,514 hikers learned how to protect alpine vegetation

In its 32nd year, the Adirondack High Peaks Summit Stewardship Program taught 28,514 hikers how to protect New York’s rarest ecosystem: the alpine zone. This brings the program’s total outreach to 613,998 hikers since 1989.


11,113 people were given Leave No Trace information at trailheads

With an estimated 100,000 people visiting the Heart Lake Program Center annually to explore the High Peaks Wilderness, ADK has stepped up its educational outreach through its Trailhead Stewardship Program.

From Memorial Day to Indigenous Peoples’ Day, volunteers greet hikers at the trailhead and help them prepare for a safe and responsible outdoor experience. This year, they reached 11,113 hikers, bringing the program’s outreach total to over 45,000 since it started in 2017.


593 fourth graders discovered the outdoors

ADK is preparing the next generation for a lifetime of outdoor exploration through its school outreach programs: Marie L. Haberl School Outreach Program: Three Seasons at Heart Lake and Bringing Heart Lake to Your Backyard. This fall, 593 fourth graders—433 in-person and 160 online—participated and learned about responsible recreation, fall changes, and more.


299 trails and lean-tos maintained

Our 281 Trail Steward and Adopt a Lean-to volunteers took care of 201 lean-tos and 98 trails this year, ensuring that hikers had clear trails to follow and clean lean-tos to enjoy while exploring the backcountry.


6 trails built or repaired

In an era of climate change and increased use, ADK’s professional trail crew is creating sustainable, climate-resilient trails that will last for generations. This year, we worked on 6 major projects in the Adirondack Park, including a new trail up Mt Jo, a reroute in Avalanche Pass, and cairn building on the summit of Iroquois Peak.


None of this would have been possible without the support of people like you. Donors put tools in the hands of our professional trail crew, stewards on alpine summits, and educators in the backcountry. As we continue into our second century, we need your support to continue providing New Yorkers with the resources they need to have a safe and responsible outdoor experience.

Learn how you can support ADK here.